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Health + Lifestyle

  • Scientists identify genetic variation that promotes longevity in men

    Researchers have found a mutation in the gene for the growth hormone receptor that promotes longevity, increasing men’s lifespan by an average of 10 years.

     

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  • Walnuts reduce hunger by activating a certain brain region, say researchers

    Scientists have shown that eating walnuts activates a region of the brain involved in the control of hunger and food cravings, which could explain why people report feeling full after eating them.

     

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  • Lowering nicotine levels, use of e-cigarettes and raising cigarette prices associated with smoking cessation

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have waged a war against smoking and now new steps are in place to help quitters go ahead and stop smoking.

     

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  • Binge TV viewing increasingly prevalent – poses a threat to sleep.

    According to new research that looked at the TV viewing habits and sleep histories of 423 persons between ages of 18 and 25 years, binge watching or consuming multiple episodes of a TV series at one sitting can significantly affect sleep. Regular TV watching on the other hand does not affect sleep detrimentally to that […]

     

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  • Peanut allergy successfully kept at bay with immune-based therapy

    Australian researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute have come up with a latest study results showing that peanut allergy could be treated successfully with an immune-based therapy. This new therapy helped children allergic to peanuts eat these nuts with no reactions for up to four years. The study appeared this week in the journal […]

     

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  • Pubic hair grooming pitfalls: New study

    A new study has shown that over a quarter of those who shave, wax or use laser hair removal for grooming pubic hair might be in for some form of mishap during the process. For the study the researchers placed questionnaires to participants regarding their approach to pubic hair grooming.

     

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  • Natural ways to support a healthy liver

    Summer is here and with it comes the potential for fun, frolics and a little more alcohol than usual. Whether it’s festival beers, holiday cocktails or a few too many Pimms’ at the family BBQ, with increased alcohol consumption comes an increased workload for your liver.

     

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  • Mayo Clinic researchers discover new cause of treatment resistance in prostate cancer

    Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a new cause of treatment resistance in prostate cancer. Their discovery also suggests ways to improve prostate cancer therapy. The findings appear in Nature Medicine.

     

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  • Large study looks at beneficial and detrimental effects of alcohol consumption

    According to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, light to moderate consumption of alcohol can actually reduce the risk of deaths due to cardiovascular causes while heavy drinking may raise the risk of deaths due to all causes and also due to cancers.

     

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  • A mismatch of sweeteness and calories could be triggering weight gain, study says

    A new research published in the journal Current Biology, which was done by a group of researchers from the Yale University, U.S suggests that diet drinks as well as foods might actually increase weight and thereby trigger diabetes as the brain slows down metabolism when there is a mismatch between sweetness and calories.

     

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  • Survey shows increase in U.S. men’s condom use

    A new survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which was published yesterday by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics suggests that over a third of adult men in the nation presently assert the use of condom during sex.

     

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  • Reduced sensitivity to alcohol appears to protect women against risk of regretted sex

    Heavy drinking can have a number of negative consequences, including sex that is later regretted. Low sensitivity (LS) to alcohol’s effects – which characterizes the person who can “drink everyone under the table” – is a known risk factor for heavy drinking and its consequences.

     

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  • Marijuana use linked with risk of death from hypertension, study says

    New research published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology yesterday states that the use of marijuana is linked with a three-fold risk of death due to hypertension.

     

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  • An exercise pill for heart failure patients

    According to latest research, scientists at the Ottawa University, Canada have come up with a pill that can mimic the effects of regular exercise. This could be significantly beneficial to heart failure patients. The study was published in the journal Nature.

     

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  • Colorectal cancer deaths on the rise among Americans: JAMA study

    A new study from the American Cancer Society has found that more people living in the United States of America are dying from colon and rectal cancers around the age of 50 years when they are supposed to officially begin screening for these cancers. The new study is published in the journal JAMA, the Journal […]

     

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  • Study finds decline in stroke rates for men but not women

    The overall rate of stroke in the United States has been declining in recent years and while that has been good news, a new study suggests it may be primarily good news for men.

     

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  • Wireless remote monitoring: the future for patients with atrial fibrillation?

    Peerbridge Health has the vision to remove all wires associated with monitoring patients. For example, typically, electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring systems have a multitude of wires. They started building a wireless ECG monitoring system called the Peerbridge Cor™ to improve ECG monitoring from the ground up.

     

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  • Increase in reported cases of Cyclospora infections compared to last year, CDC reports

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a Health Alert Network (HAN) Health Advisory on 7th August 2017, Monday, in order to alert the health care facilities and the public health department on the increase in the reported cases of cyclosporiasis.

     

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  • Opioid overdose death toll continues upward trend

    According to the National Center for Health Statistics report, the overdose deaths among the persons with drug abusers in 2016 is on an upward rise that has not stopped. These rising numbers are disheartening because the intensified efforts to curb these numbers are thus seemingly not working.

     

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  • Prostate cancer cells gain unnatural ability to change shape and spread

    Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report they have discovered a biochemical process that gives prostate cancer cells the almost unnatural ability to change their shape, squeeze into other organs and take root in other parts of the body.

     

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  • Researchers demonstrate potential of new PET tracer for imaging prostate cancer

    In the featured translational article in the August issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers at the University of Michigan demonstrate the potential of a new PET tracer, Carbon-11 labeled sarcosine (11C-sarcosine), for imaging prostate cancer, and set the stage for its possible use in monitoring other cancers.

     

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  • Study finds brains of women to be more active than men

    In the largest functional brain imaging study to date, the Amen Clinics (Newport Beach, CA) compared 46,034 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging studies provided by nine clinics, quantifying differences between the brains of men and women.

     

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  • Social isolation and loneliness is a greater threat to public health than obesity, study states

    A research presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on 5th August 2017 suggests that a higher public health hazard might be represented by loneliness and social isolation than obesity.

     

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  • Mouse model developed to allow study of Zika virus transmission

    Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have developed a mouse model to study the sexual and fetal transmission of Zika virus. This will enable studies to further understanding of how the Zika virus spreads, thereby allowing treatments to be developed.

     

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  • Researchers identify new genetic mutation that prevents sperm production

    Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Soroka University Medical Center in Beer-Sheva, Israel have discovered a new genetic mutation that prevents sperm production.

     

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  • Global blindness rates expected to soar within a few decades

    Blindness is expected to become three times more prevalent across the globe within the next four decades, warn researchers. According to a study published in Lancet Global Health, an estimated 36 million cases of blindness in 2015 is set to rise to 115 million by 2050, if funding for treatment is not increased.

     

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  • Statins prescribed to less than 50% of stroke patients across the US, says study

    A new research published in the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association – Journal of the American Heart Association – suggests that, prescriptions for statins, a type of cholesterol-lowering medication, are received by less than a half of the stroke patients discharged from the hospital across the nation.

     

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  • Ebola virus RNA can persist in semen of survivors two years after infection, researchers say

    Ebola virus RNA can persist in the semen of survivors more than two years after the onset of infection researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found.

     

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  • Loss of dietary protein from food as carbon dioxide emissions fail to fall – warn researchers

    According to researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, if the present rates of carbon dioxide emissions do not stop, people in around 18 countries worldwide may face a loss of around 5% of the protein they obtain from their diet by 2015. This is due to the reduction in the nutrient […]

     

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  • Problem and pathological gambling addictions linked to childhood traumas

    Men with problem and pathological gambling addictions are more likely to have suffered childhood traumas including physical abuse or witnessing violence in the home, according to new research.

     

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  • Sexual transmission of Zika virus reported in Florida

    Yesterday, Florida Department of Health reported the first case of sexually transmitted Zika virus this year.

     

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  • Shaping the future of oncology treatment

    Victories Over Cancer is about enabling those affected by cancer to enjoy more of life’s meaning full moments and making cancer more manageable. At Janssen, we’re really thinking about the elimination of cancer, and we take a very deliberate approach to that.

     

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  • Vision Express research reveals 30% of UK drivers are overdue an eye test

    MP Barry Sheerman (Huddersfield) is calling for the UK’s drivers to stop putting themselves and their families at risk this summer by ensuring they have had a recent eye test.

     

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  • “Fat switch” may hold the key to obesity finds new study

    Scientists have been trying for years now to understand what causes overweight and obesity in some but not in others. Now researchers at the Monash University’s Biomedicine Discovery Institute seem to have solved the puzzle that has been baffling them all – a so called “fat switch” in the brain that regulates weight gain. This […]

     

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  • Researchers explore how providers perceive fathers’ role in early intervention services for children

    Early intervention services for children with disabilities or developmental delays are focused on being family centered and are ideally conducted in the home setting. Even so, fathers—custodial or noncustodial—are often left out of the process.

     

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  • Inflammatory biomarkers may help diagnose chronic fatigue syndrome

    Researchers have discovered inflammation biomarkers that could help scientists to research, diagnose and even treat chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Also referred to as myalgic encephomyelitis, CFS is a poorly-understood condition characterized by profound, long-term tiredness.

     

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  • Cardiovascular advantages of the Mediterranean diet linked to socioeconomic status

    A study conducted by a team of researchers from the Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (I.R.C.C.S.) Neuromed, Italy, states that the risk of cardiovascular disease is reduced by the Mediterranean diet; however, the benefits are subjected to highly educated or rich people alone.

     

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  • Bio-Oil supports self-care for wounds to minimise scarring through new patient booklet

    A new patient resource has launched in the UK offering primary care healthcare professionals (HCPs) the opportunity to help patients self-care for their wounds and minimise scarring.

     

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  • Methamphetamine use does not only cause death through overdose, warn researchers

    Overdose is not the only cause of death among people who die as a result of using the drug methamphetamine or “ice,” say researchers.

     

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  • New regulation plan for preventing tobacco and nicotine related adverse effects by FDA

    A novel comprehensive plan for the regulation of tobacco and nicotine was announced by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA, on 28th July 2017. This plan is expected to serve as a roadmap that can be implemented through multiple years in improving the protection of kids as well as reducing the diseases and deaths […]

     

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  • Researchers reveal ‘hidden’ experiences of men forced to have sex with women

    The most frequent strategy used by women forcing men to have sex with them against their will is blackmail and threats, according to researchers at Lancaster University.

     

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  • High sugar intake can be detrimental to psychological well-being

    Research published yesterday, has found that high sugar intake from sweet foods and drinks can adversely affect long-term psychological health.

     

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  • Third-person self-talk helps control emotion, says study

    A study published online in a nature journal Scientific Reports suggests that talking in the third person to oneself in stressful times might help controlling emotions and it needs no additional mental effort than first person self-talk, which is normally used by people to talk to themselves.

     

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  • Moderate alcohol consumption and diabetes – benefits are found in new study

    There have been several studies that have connected excessive drinking to type 2 diabetes. However, there are no studies that have actually looked at the drinking patterns and frequency and diabetes. Danish researchers have thus tried to understand the connection and explore if moderate alcohol consumption has a beneficial effect on diabetes. This new study […]

     

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  • Researchers provide insight into different types of ‘true’ smiles

    The smile may be the most common and flexible expression, used to reveal some emotions, cover others and manage social interactions that have kept communities secure and organized for millennia.

     

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  • Researchers provide evidence supporting need for gender-specific anti-inflammatory drugs

    Perhaps you have come across the titles ‘Men are from Mars, women are from Venus’ or ‘Why men don’t listen and women can’t read maps’: just two of the many books and articles — some enlightening or amusing and others irritating — that theorise about fundamental differences between men and women.

     

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  • Drinking alcohol after learning could help recall information better, study says

    A new study conducted by the University of Exeter, U.K., states that consuming alcohol improves memory for information that is learned before starting the drinking episode. This study, published on 24th July 2017, in the Nature journal Scientific Reports, enrolled 88 social drinkers – 57 females and 31 males – who were in the age […]

     

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  • Effects of declining sperm counts on fertility, mortality and disease patterns in geographical areas: Study

    There is a lack of definitive data on the actual trends of decline in sperm counts according to researchers despite it being a known fact. Researchers in a new study looked at a large population to find the exact data regarding this scenario and its effects on the society. They looked at the effects of […]

     

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  • Men with hepatitis B more likely to develop severe liver disease despite lifestyle choices

    Why men with hepatitis B remain more than twice as likely to develop severe liver disease than women remains a mystery, even after a study led by a recent Drexel University graduate took lifestyle choices and environments into account.

     

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  • Penile bacteria may be risk factor for HIV infection in men, study shows

    A ten-fold increase in some types of bacteria living under the foreskin can increase a man’s risk of HIV infection by up to 63 percent, according to a new study out today by researchers at Milken Institute School of Public Health

     

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  • Cocktail of drugs for HIV patients with advanced immunosuppression reduced deaths by 27%, study shows

    A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on 20th July 2017 suggests that a cocktail of drugs, if provided at the beginning of the HIV therapy, can save over 10,000 lives per year. HIV, which is often diagnosed late, leaves people vulnerable to other diseases by ravaging the immune system.

     

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  • Buying time increases happiness, study reveals

    A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on 24th July 2017, suggests that spending money in buying time – like paying to hand over household works such as cleaning or cooking – is associated with increased life satisfaction.

     

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  • Classic signaling pathway holds key to prostate cancer progression

    Researchers published a study investigating the processes through which androgen receptors affect prostate cancer progression. The publication illuminates a known metabolic pathway as a potential novel therapeutic target. The researchers have demonstrated that androgens take control of the AMPK signaling cascade to increase prostate cancer cell growth.