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Health + Lifestyle

  • HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could be cost saving for NHS in long run

    For men who have sex with men in the UK, a programme that involved providing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) treatment for HIV could be cost effective and cost saving finds a new study. The economic evaluation was made by a team led by Valentina Cambiano, of University College London and published in the latest issue of […]

     

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  • Blood transfusions should be gender matched between donor and recipient

    An emergency blood transfusion mandates matching of the blood types so that the donor and the recipient are compatible in their blood types. There is no other matching between the blood bag and the recipient – race, ethnicity, religion, gender etc.

     

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  • Scientists discover how sugar fuels cancer growth

    A nine-year research project looking at the link between sugar and cancer has led to an important breakthrough in cancer research.

     

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  • White men who exercise at high levels have greater risk for plaque buildup in arteries

    White men who exercise at high levels are 86 percent more likely than people who exercise at low levels to experience a buildup of plaque in the heart arteries by middle age, a new study suggests.

     

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  • Study finds link between sleep duration and measure of chromosomal health in sperm

    A new study found a link between sleep duration and a measure of chromosomal health in sperm. The findings are published in the Journal of Sleep Research.

     

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  • The sale of “super-size” chocolate bars to be banned in England hospitals

    NHS England has said it will be banning the sale of “super-sized” chocolate bars in hospital shops, canteens and vending machines.

     

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  • Low-fat avocados could be the new “in” thing

    Avocados have been hailed as a wonder fruit packed with nutritional values and something diet experts and customers swear by.

     

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  • Genes that determine skin color studied – new revelations

    Human populations vary vastly in skin tones. European populations have been studied and some of the genes that determine skin color have been found. A latest study in a varied African population has found the specific and new genetic variants that could determine skin color and skin pigmentation. The study report is published in the […]

     

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  • Research aims to raise awareness of higher rate of testicular cancer in patients with DS

    Research by Jue Wang, MD, at the University of Arizona Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center on “Delay in Diagnosis of Testicular Cancer in a Patient with Down Syndrome” was published in the October issue of Journal of Cancer and Therapeutic Science.

     

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  • UC biologists find link between paternal diet and offspring’s health

    Doctors long have stressed the importance of good nutrition for expectant mothers. Now biologists at the University of Cincinnati say the father’s diet could play a similar role in the health of a baby.

     

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  • Birth control method for men by gene editing

    Researchers at the Michigan State University have come closer to finding an effective method of male contraception. Men have been notorious in not choosing to be responsible of their fertility and not adopting contraception.

     

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  • Genetic discovery provides strong lead for future research on male contraception

    When it comes to birth control, many males turn to two options: condoms or vasectomies. While the two choices are effective, both methods merely focus on blocking the transportation of sperm.

     

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  • Cardiovascular risk factors for married men linked to changes in relationship quality over time

    The available research points to an association between marital status and health, but it’s not clear whether this observed link is influenced by the health of people entering into marriage or the protective effects of the marriage itself.

     

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  • Brains of men and women respond differently to prosocial, selfish behavior

    Behavioral experiments have shown that when women share a sum of money more generously than men. To gain a more in-depth understanding of this behavior, neuroscientists from the Department of Economics looked at the areas of the brain that are active when decisions of this kind are made.

     

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  • Genetic signature within prostate cancer cells can predict metastatic tumors

    Many prostate cancers, which generally are diagnosed in older men, are “indolent,” slow-growing tumors that aren’t destined to be fatal. But some tumors are prone to becoming aggressive and spreading beyond the prostate, making them difficult to treat and life-threatening.

     

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  • Study sheds light on complex process involved in development of sperm stem cells

    New research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah and collaborators at University of Utah Health sheds light on the complex process that occurs in the development of human sperm stem cells.

     

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  • Watching a hockey match may stress the heart, warn researchers

    The excitement of watching a hockey match has been found to have a significant effect on the cardiovascular system, suggesting a potential link between watching sporting events and cardiac incidents.

     

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  • Study finds underutilization of sperm banking by at-risk patients with cancer

    A comprehensive study of adolescent and young adult cancer patients found just 43.8 percent of those at risk for infertility banked sperm prior to cancer therapy, suggesting that patients might benefit from efforts to increase awareness and understanding of the option.

     

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  • Cancers linked to obesity account for 40% of all cancers in the US, report states

    Being obese or overweight is linked to an increased risk of developing 13 types of cancer, according to the latest Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Cancer Institute. These cancers accounted for approximately 40% of all cancers diagnosed in the US, in 2014.

     

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  • Exercising for just one hour a week can prevent depression, study finds

    The Black Dog Institute has published a study showing that regular exercise can protect against depression, even if it is just for one hour a week.

     

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  • Gay and bisexual men with lower education, income have higher suicide risks

    Gay and bisexual men making less than $30,000 a year and without a university degree have more than five times the odds of attempting suicide compared with their more advantaged peers, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

     

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  • Sperm and eggs of transgenders to be stored by NHS before sex changes

    Several transgender adolescents are opting to freeze their eggs and sperm with the Britain’s NHS to leave an option for parenthood later in life open, according to doctors.

     

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  • Losing sense of smell linked to dementia

    Scientists have found that losing the sense of smell is an early sign that a person is at risk of development of dementia later in life. The study entitled “Olfactory Dysfunction Predicts Subsequent Dementia in Older US Adults,” was published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

     

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  • SunVit-D3 outline the importance of Vitamin D consumption

    To mark the clocks going back on the 29th October, new research by SunVit-D3, reveals that Brits are surprisingly unaware of the importance of Vitamin D and the effects it can have on us.

     

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  • Weight loss and its economic implications finally quantified

    Weight loss has been linked to good health and it is known that maintaining a healthy body weight can lower the risk of several diseases including heart disease, diabetes, cancer etc. Reducing the burden of these diseases can also benefit the society in terms of reducing healthcare costs. However how much does losing weight benefit […]

     

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  • Potential Zika vaccine blocks mother-to-fetus transmission and stops male testis infection

    For the first time, a collaborative team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has shown that a potential Zika vaccine quickly can protect fetuses against infection as well as protect males against testicular infection and injury.

     

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  • Lack of sleep and arguments with your spouse can cause stress-related inflammation, study reveals

    A new study published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, conducted by the researchers from the Ohio State University Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research indicates that the lack of sleep doesn’t just make a person cranky and looking for a fight, it also results in the risk of stress-related inflammation.

     

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  • UTSA professor awarded grant to support development of prostate cancer detection method

    Jing Yong Ye, professor of biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has received a two-year, $354,617 grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute to support the development of his noninvasive method of detecting prostate cancer.

     

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  • Facial features could predict sex drive finds

    According to the latest research from Nipissing University in Ontario, Canada, the sex drive of a person could be predicted from the size and shape of their faces.

     

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  • Lack of sleep could be blamed for many major diseases says sleep scientist Matt Walker

    Lack of sleep is one of the commonest maladies affectingthe modern work force. A leading sleep scientist has explored the whys and wherefores of sleep and why is it that very few people actually get enough sleep at night? Matthew Walker, a professor at University of California, Berkeley and director of the institution’s Center for […]

     

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  • Care for Dental Bridges

    Patients who have undergone a dental bridge procedure should be advised as to the best ways to care for the bridge to prolong its lifespan.

     

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  • Lead in water leading to problems with fertility and childbirth in Flint, Michigan

    Researchers from the University of Kansas, Department of Economics in a new working paper series in Theoretical and Applied Economics write that with the change in water sources in Flint, Michigan since April 2014, lead exposure to the population has risen.

     

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  • Increased adrenaline levels in non-smokers’ hearts seen with the use of one e-cigarette with nicotine

    A new study conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles, found that if non-smokers use one electronic cigarette that contains nicotine, they experience a rise in adrenaline levels in their heart; however, if the e-cigarette is nicotine-free, there was no increase in the levels of adrenaline.

     

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  • Study shows link between obesity and low sperm quality

    The journal Andologia has published the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on computer aided sperm analysis. The findings suggest that clinicians may need to factor in paternal obesity prior to assisted reproduction.

     

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  • Scientists find a way to convert “bad body fat” to “good fat”

    Researchers have found that the unhealthy fat in the body called “white fat” could be converted to a healthier fat by blocking a special protein. This could help fight the obesity epidemic they speculate. The report was published in the journal Cell Reports.

     

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  • Classic signaling pathway holds key to prostate cancer progression

    Researchers published a study investigating the processes through which androgen receptors affect prostate cancer progression. The publication illuminates a known metabolic pathway as a potential novel therapeutic target. The researchers have demonstrated that androgens take control of the AMPK signaling cascade to increase prostate cancer cell growth.