Log In

Health + Lifestyle

  • Prostate cancer researchers find significant disparities between two liquid biopsy providers

    Two Johns Hopkins prostate cancer researchers found significant disparities when they submitted identical patient samples to two different commercial liquid biopsy providers.

     

    read more
  • Study finds erectile dysfunction as risk factor for early cardiovascular disease

    Despite decades-long prevention and treatment efforts, cardiovascular (CV) disease continues to be the leading cause of death worldwide.

     

    read more
  • Hydraulic fracturing is harmful to infants health, study states

    A new study published in Science Advances reveals that infants born to mothers who live within 2 miles of a hydraulic fracturing site or fracking site have increased health risks.

     

    read more
  • Outpatient total knee replacement surgery linked to higher rates of complications

    Some complications are more common when total knee replacement surgery is done as an outpatient or same-day procedure, reports a study in the December 6, 2017 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

     

    read more
  • People diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may actually have treatable condition

    Researchers at Houston Methodist believe that a significant number of people diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may actually have a treatable immune system condition.

     

    read more
  • Relieving Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis with Exercise

    We know that exercise is beneficial in helping someone to maintain their lung function, stay strong and active and maintain a good quality of life. We also know that exercise can complement ‘airway clearance techniques’ – breathing exercises prescribed by physiotherapists to help clear the lungs of mucus.

     

    read more
  • Study finds social stigma as barrier to successful treatment of children with HIV in Ethiopia

    The social stigma surrounding HIV is still strong in many parts of the world. Children living with HIV in Ethiopia are at high risk of receiving inadequate treatment – or no treatment at all – on account of deeply rooted prejudice.

     

    read more
  • Telemedicine for addiction treatment? Picture remains fuzzy

    When President Donald Trump declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency, it came with a regulatory change intended to make it easier for people to get care. The declaration allows for doctors to prescribe addiction medicine virtually, without ever seeing the patient in person.

     

    read more
  • Terror survivors have increased risk of frequent migraine, tension headaches

    Survivors of a terror attack have an increased risk of frequent migraine and tension headaches after the attack, according to a study published in the December 13, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

     

    read more
  • Loyola Medicine otolaryngologist corrects sleep apnea symptoms with ENT procedure

    For Jason Johnson, nights were anything but restful. The 16-year-old high school student would often wake up with difficulty breathing.

     

    read more
  • Radiation therapy can be used to treat patients with life-threatening heart rhythm

    Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that radiation therapy – aimed directly at the heart -; can be used to treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm.

     

    read more
  • Good friends might be your best brain booster as you age

    Ask Edith Smith, a proud 103-year-old, about her friends, and she’ll give you an earful. There’s Johnetta, 101, whom she’s known for 70 years and who has Alzheimer’s disease. “I call her every day and just say ‘Hi, how are you doing?’ She never knows, but she says hi back, and I tease her,” Smith […]

     

    read more
  • Male virgins still at risk for acquiring HPV, study finds

    Men who have never engaged in sexual intercourse are still at risk for acquiring HPV, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Infectious Diseases by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health.

     

    read more
  • Researchers adopt new approach to treating advanced prostate cancer

    Scientists have proposed a new approach to preventing the proliferation of prostate tumor cells that are no longer responding to treatment. Prostate cancer can usually be cured via surgical removal of the tumor and/or the use of radiotherapy, but in one-fifth of cases, patients also require treatment with drugs to continue removing tumor cells. However, […]

     

    read more
  • Researchers discover new way to attack drug-resistant prostate cancer cells

    In most cases, prostate cancer is cured by surgical removal of the tumor and/or by radiotherapy. However, 20% of patients will need treatment to remove tumor cells but this treatment ceases to be effective after two or three years and the cancer develops further.

     

    read more
  • E-cigarette use among youth leads to smoking as adults finds study

    E-cigarettes and vaping is considered to be a harmless version of the real thing with many manufacturers selling them to the youth. There are candy and a host of other flavoured e-cigarettes that are being sold to the youth. A new study from the University of Pittsburgh has found that use of these among the […]

     

    read more
  • Having older brothers may increase the likelihood of being gay

    Scientists have found a distinct pattern that having older brothers raise the chances of the younger sibling being gay. This effect has been termed the “fraternal birth order effect”. They explain the biological reason behind this propensity in their new study that was published this week in the journal PNAS.

     

    read more
  • Generic versions of Viagra coming this week

    Drug manufacturer Pfizer is coming up with a cheaper and generic version of their erectile dysfunction pill Viagra this week.

     

    read more
  • UVA researchers developing tool to help prostate cancer patients weigh treatment options

    Researchers at the University of Virginia Cancer Center are developing a tool to help patients with prostate cancer better understand the potential risks and rewards of their treatment options.

     

    read more
  • Infection with one HPV type strongly increases risk of reinfection in men

    A new analysis of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) in men shows that infection with one HPV type strongly increases the risk of reinfection with the same type.

     

    read more
  • Shorter course of radiation may be preferred treatment for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among males in the United States. Approximately, 180,000 men are diagnosed each year, and approximately 95 percent of these men have localized disease that is potentially curable.

     

    read more
  • PET scans can predict prostate cancer patients’ response to salvage radiation treatment

    For prostate cancer patients who have rising levels of PSA (a cancer indicator) even after radical prostatectomy, early treatment makes a difference.

     

    read more
  • Female Parkinson’s disease patients less likely to receive caregiver support than men

    Female Parkinson’s disease patients are much less likely than male patients to have caregivers, despite the fact that caregivers report greater strain in caring for male patients.

     

    read more
  • New CSHL method pinpoints which prostate tumors pose fatal threat before surgery

    The facts about prostate cancer can be confusing. It’s the third most common cancer type among Americans – 161,000 men will be diagnosed this year, the National Cancer Institute estimates. Yet according to the NCI, 98.6% will be alive in 5 years.

     

    read more
  • Human sperm may hold potential to serve as biomarkers of future health

    Human sperm may hold the potential to serve as biomarkers of the future health of newborn infants, according to a new study by a Wayne State University School of Medicine research team.

     

    read more
  • Improving Healthcare in the Community through Eye Examinations

    Paul Morris is the Director of Professional Advancement for Specsavers Opticians in the UK and Ireland. The role involves furthering clinical scope, professional services, standards, training and forming future strategy for the group. He previously held the role of Director of Optometry Advancement.

     

    read more
  • Excessive vomiting linked to prolonged and heavy marijuana use

    There have been some reports of chronic vomiting and retching due to long term marijuana use. In a new study, researchers find that long term heavy marijuana use especially in regions where marijuana is legalized, the cases of unexplained and difficult-to-treat vomiting and nausea are on the rise.

     

    read more
  • Hackensack Meridian Health Bayshore Medical Center now offers MRI/ultrasound fusion biopsy

    Hackensack Meridian Health Bayshore Medical Center is proud to announce that it has expanded services to include targeted MRI ultrasound for prostate biopsy.

     

    read more
  • Study reveals link of male-pattern baldness and premature graying with early heart disease

    New research presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the Cardiological Society of India (CSI) indicated that premature greying and male-pattern baldness are linked to a greater than fivefold risk of heart disease before the age of 40. The study also suggested obesity is linked to a fourfold risk of early heart disease.

     

    read more
  • INRS researchers evaluate how chemotherapy among men affects health of future generations

    How do cancer and cancer treatments affect the reproductive function of men? Can this affect the health of their direct descendants and subsequent generations? To get a clear picture, INRS researchers evaluate the current state of knowledge on this public health issue in a review article appearing in the journal Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité.

     

    read more
  • Marriage may reduce the risk of dementia, study says

    An amalgamation of the available evidence published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry suggests that marriage may decrease the risk of developing dementia.

     

    read more
  • Patients rate physicians less positively if they have their requests denied

    People who ask their doctors for specialist referrals and certain tests or medications, but then don’t receive them, tend to report less satisfaction with their doctors than people who have their requests fulfilled, research shows.

     

    read more
  • Process of removing cellular debris can fuel tumor growth in metastatic prostate cancer

    The goal of any cancer treatment is to kill tumor cells. Yet, one little understood paradox of certain cancers is that the body’s natural process for removing dead and dying cells can actually fuel tumor growth.

     

    read more
  • Tobacco companies finally own up to cigarette smoking risks

    It has been a decade since federal courts have found tobacco companies to be deceiving the general public by hiding the exact level of risk associated with cigarette smoking. Now finally the tobacco companies have agreed to own up the risks and air a set of advertisements on television and newspapers to correct the statements […]

     

    read more
  • 4 in 10 cancers preventable by adopting simple lifestyle changes

    In a new research that comes via the American Cancer Society, it has been seen that over 40 percent of all cancers and nearly one in two cancer deaths can be prevented by incorporating simple lifestyle changes in daily routines.

     

    read more
  • 5 kg of metal removed from man’s stomach

    Doctors in Madhya Pradesh India, recently were shocked to find 5 kg of iron objects in a man’s stomach while operating on him for a suspected stomach bug.

     

    read more
  • UVA researchers developing new tool to help cancer patients make complex care decisions

    Researchers at the University of Virginia Cancer Center are developing a tool to help patients with prostate cancer better understand the potential risks and rewards of their treatment options. And that tool could ultimately benefit not just those patients but a broad spectrum of patients making complex care decisions based on their tumor’s genomic information.

     

    read more
  • Small protein modification can trigger invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, research finds

    A small protein modification can trigger the aggressive migratory and invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, according to new research published on the cover of Oncotarget. The findings give greater insight into how cancers can move from one location in the body to another, and could help develop more effective therapies in the future.

     

    read more
  • Study finds improvement in men’s health and negative health trend among women

    Researchers at Umeå University and Region Norrbotten in Sweden have studied health trends among women and men aged 25-34 from 1990-2014. In 1990, 8.5 percent of women self-rated their health as being worse than peers in their own age group.

     

    read more
  • Young people in Britain becoming more sexually adventurous

    New research has shown that young heterosexual couples in United Kingdom are trying out a wide range of different sexual practices including anal sex with their partners of the opposite sex.

     

    read more
  • Use of Prostate Health Index cuts down need for uncomfortable biopsies

    The Prostate Health Index is a cost-effective tool used by urologists to detect prostate cancer. It reduces the risk of over diagnosis, and cuts down on the need to send men for unnecessary and often uncomfortable biopsies.

     

    read more
  • Australian government urged to sue tobacco companies

    First it was Canada and now Australian state and federal governments are being urged to go ahead and sue to tobacco companies. Billions of dollars are being spent in treating tobacco-related diseases and ailments of the general public and some of it could be compensated this way feel experts.

     

    read more
  • Classic signaling pathway holds key to prostate cancer progression

    Researchers published a study investigating the processes through which androgen receptors affect prostate cancer progression. The publication illuminates a known metabolic pathway as a potential novel therapeutic target. The researchers have demonstrated that androgens take control of the AMPK signaling cascade to increase prostate cancer cell growth.